CIRVA

The Mexican government assembled a committee of international experts to assess the necessary methods to save the Vaquita. The International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA) previously met in 1997, 1999, and 2004. Members of CIRVA met again in February 2012 and reviewed progress of the Vaquita since the last meeting. The CIRVA recommendations are in this report:

Executive summary in Spanish: http://bit.ly/ID2sQS

In English: http://bit.ly/Hrgm92

The Vaquita population is still declining and is probably made up of under 200 individual Vaquitas.

Science project

My younger brother and sister decided to do their Elementary School Science Project on the Vaquita! I will definitely be keeping a watchful eye on them (I can’t help myself), but it should be a good learning experience for them, and more importantly, the entire school. When I was in that school in 5th Grade, I told my class about the Vaquita and gave them brochures (see ¡Viva Vaquita! website). We originally hoped to do a fundraiser, but the idea kind of drifted away. I hope this project will help teach the kids (I know I’m a kid, too) about this extremely important issue, and maybe get the fundraiser idea rolling again!

Other names

Some other names for the Vaquita are Cochito, Gulf of California Harbor Porpoise, Gulf of California Porpoise, Gulf Porpoise, Hafenschweinswal, and Marsouin du Golfe de Californie.

EDGE species

The Vaquita is one of the top 100 EDGE species, meaning “Evolutionarily Distinct, Globally Endangered.” Evolutionarily distinct animals have no close relatives and represent proportionally more of the tree of life than other species, meaning they are top priority for conservation campaigns. As of September 21, 2011, $32.6 million had been invested for the Vaquita. But that’s not enough. Please donate here.